How to Assign a Static IP Address in Windows 7, 8, 10, XP, or Vista

When organizing your home network it’s easier to assign each computer it’s own IP address than using DHCP. Here we will take a look at doing it in XP, Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8.x, and Windows 10.
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If you have a home network with several computes and devices, it’s a good idea to assign each of them a specific address. If you use DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol), each computer will request and be assigned an address every time it’s booted up. When you have to do troubleshooting on your network, it’s annoying going to each machine to figure out what IP they have.
Using Static IPs prevents address conflicts between devices and allows you to manage them more easily. Assigning IPs to Windows is essentially the same process, but getting to where you need to be varies between each version.



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Windows 7 or Windows 8.x or Windows 10

To change the computer’s IP address in Windows, type network and sharing into the Search box in the Start Menu and select Network and Sharing Center when it comes up. If you are in Windows 8.x it will be on the Start Screen itself, like the screenshot at the top of this article. If you’re in Windows 7 or 10 it’ll be in the start menu.

Then when the Network and Sharing Center opens, click on Change adapter settings. This will be the same on Windows 7 or 8.x or 10.

Right-click on your local adapter and select Properties.

In the Local Area Connection Properties window highlight Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) then click the Properties button.

Now select the radio button Use the following IP address and enter in the correct IP, Subnet mask, and Default gateway that corresponds with your network setup. Then enter your Preferred and Alternate DNS server addresses. Here we’re on a home network and using a simple Class C network configuration and Google DNS.
Check Validate settings upon exit so Windows can find any problems with the addresses you entered. When you’re finished click OK.

Now close out of the Local Area Connections Properties window.

Windows will run network diagnostics and verify the connection is good. Here we had no problems with it, but if you did, you could run the network troubleshooting wizard.

Now you can open the command prompt and do an ipconfig  to see the network adapter settings have been successfully changed.

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Windows Vista

Changing your IP from DHCP to a Static address in Vista is similar to Windows 7, but getting to the correct location is a bit different. Open the Start Menu, right-click on Network, and select Properties.

The Network and Sharing Center opens…click on Manage network connections.

Right-click on the network adapter you want to assign an IP address and click Properties.

Highlight Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) then click the Properties button.

Now change the IP, Subnet mask, Default Gateway, and DNS Server Addresses. When you’re finished click OK.

You’ll need to close out of Local Area Connection Properties for the settings to go into effect.

Open the Command Prompt and do an ipconfig to verify the changes were successful.

Windows XP
In this example we’re using XP SP3 Media Center Edition and changing the IP address of the Wireless adapter.
To set a Static IP in XP right-click on My Network Places and select Properties.

Right-click on the adapter you want to set the IP for and select Properties.

Highlight Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click the Properties button.

Now change the IP, Subnet mask, Default Gateway, and DNS Server Addresses. When you’re finished click OK.

You will need to close out of the Network Connection Properties screen before the changes go into effect.

Again you can verify the settings by doing an ipconfig in the command prompt. In case you’re not sure how to do this, click on Start then Run.

In the Run box type in cmd and click OK.

Then at the prompt type in ipconfig and hit Enter. This will show the IP address for the network adapter you changed.

If you have a small office or home network, assigning each computer a specific IP address makes it a lot easier to manage and troubleshoot network connection problems.

Resize a Partition for Free in Windows 7, 8.x, 10, or Vista

Windows 7, Windows 8, 8.1, 10, and Vista include a built-in functionality in Disk Management to shrink and expand partitions. No more 3rd party utilities needed! It’s worth noting that many third-party utilities will be more feature-rich, but you can do the very basic stuff in Windows without adding anything new.
To get to this utility, open up Control Panel, and type in partition into the search box.. you’ll immediately see the link show up:

If you are in Windows 8 or 8.1 you’ll need to use the Start Screen search. If you are in Windows 10, just use the Start Menu or the Control Panel search. Either way, the same thing will come up.



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How to Shrink a Partition

In the Disk Management screen, just right-click on the partition that you want to shrink, and select “Shrink Volume” from the menu.

In the Shrink dialog, you will want to enter the amount you want to shrink by, not the new size. For example, if you want to shrink your 50gb partition by roughly 10gb so that it will now be roughly 40gb, enter 10000 into the box:

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How to Extend a Partition

In the Disk Management screen, just right-click on the partition that you want to shrink, and select “Extend Volume” from the menu.

On this screen, you can specify the amount that you want to increase the partition by. In this case, I’m going to extend it back to the roughly 50GB size that it was before.
Note that the extend partition feature only works with contiguous space.

Turn on Remote Desktop in Windows 7, 8, 10, or Vista

Remote Desktop is disabled by default in Windows, but it’s easy enough to turn it back on. If you need to access your Windows PC from another box, it’s an essential thing to turn on.
This should work for the Professional versions of Windows 10, 8, 8.1, 7, or Vista.
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Important note: Remote desktop is only included in the Professional, Business, or Ultimate versions of Windows. Home editions do not have remote desktop.

Getting to the Remote Desktop Settings in Windows 8, 8.1, or 10

If you are using Windows 8, 8.1, or 10 you will need to open the desktop Control Panel and find the System panel there. Or you can search for “Remote Access” in the Start Menu or Start Screen.
Once you search, click on the “Allow remote access to your computer” item. It’ll look a little different in Windows 8, but it’s roughly the same thing.

And now you can select “Allow remote connections to this computer” from the Remote tab.

You can also choose which users can connect, or whether older versions of Windows can connect.



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Getting to the Remote Desktop Settings in Windows 7 or Vista

To get to the configuration page, you can either right-click the Computer icon and choose properties, or you can type in system into the start menu search box, and then find the entry for System.

Now you’ll want to click the Remote Settings link on the left hand side. Again, if you are using Windows 8, this is the screen that you’ll want to find – or you can search for Remote settings.

Now you can finally turn it on:

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To connect from another Vista / Win7 PC on the same network, click the bottom radio button. If you need to connect from an XP/2k machine, click the “Allow connections from computers running any version of Remote Desktop” radio button.
Don’t worry about setting up firewall rules, Vista or Windows 7 does that for you automatically.

How to Delete a Windows Service in Windows 7, 8, 10, Vista, or XP

If you are a fan of tweaking your system and disabling services, you might find that over time your Windows Services list becomes huge and unwieldy with a large number of services in the list that will never be enabled.
Instead of just disabling a service, you can alternatively completely delete the service. This technique can be especially helpful if you’ve installed some piece of software that doesn’t uninstall correctly, and leaves an item in the service list.
This should work in Windows 10, 8, 7, Vista, and even XP.
Important Note: Once you delete a service, it’s gone, and it’s going to be a pain to add it back. Use with caution. Or don’t use it at all unless you are trying to clean up a malware infestation.

Deleting a Windows Service

The first thing you’ll need to do is identify the name of the service, so open up Services through the start menu or control panel, and then find the service in the list that you want to delete. If you can’t figure out how to open it, use WIN + R and type in services.msc.

You’ll want to open up the properties by double-clicking on the service name, and then highlight the “Service name” value and copy it to the clipboard. This is what we’ll need to disable it.

You’ll need to open up a command prompt, and if you are using Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 10, or Vista you’ll need to right-click the command prompt and choose Run as Administrator. We’ll use the sc command to actually do the work.
The syntax used to delete a service is this:

sc delete ServiceName

If your service name has spaces in it, you’ll need to wrap the service name in quotes, like this:

sc delete “Adobe LM Service”

Note that I’m not recommending deleting this particular service, it’s just an example.
Now if you use the F5 key to refresh your Services list, you’ll see that the service is gone.

I’ve found that using this technique (carefully) can make your Services list a lot more useful, since you don’t have to weed through dozens of items you will never have enabled.
Note: You should think long and hard before deleting a service, because it’s very difficult to get them back once they are gone.