The Trackor Monitors Amazon Prices; Integrates with Chrome, Firefox, and Safari

If you’re a frequent Amazon shopper The Tracktor is an invaluable shopping aide. Visit the website or, better yet, add the extension to your browser for detailed price history and price drop notifications.
When you visit the web site you can plug in an Amazon URL to receive price history for that item and then set up an email notification if it drops to a certain price point. That’s great but you’ll likely under use it because it involves an extra trip to a third-party site when you’re shopping. Installing the extension actually changes the Amazon shopping interface, as seen in the screenshot here, and adds in a price history graph and an notification widget that lets you set a price point alert.
The price history is extremely useful for deciding if now is a good time to buy or if the current high is part of the price cycle of that product. In our example here the SousVide Supreme is currently $399 down from a historical $450 high, it’s the lowest the price has been since The Tracktor started tracking the item back in September of last year.
The Tracktor is a free service. Visit the link below to try out the web site or grab the extension and integrate it right into your browsing experience.
The Tracktor

How to Sync Your Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer Bookmarks with Safari

If you use a Mac and Windows on a regular basis, then chances are pretty good you use a browser other than Safari. However, if you want to use Safari and keep your bookmarks synced, here’s how to do that.
One of the things about using Safari on a Mac or iOS device is that if you use Windows with another browser, your bookmarks won’t sync if you use Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Chrome.

RELATED ARTICLEHow to Install and Use Apple iCloud on Windows Computers
Luckily, if you use the iCloud for Windows app, then you can easily use it to sync your bookmarks from all three of these browsers with Safari.
We’ve talked about the iCloud app in the past, today we want to specifically discuss its bookmark syncing abilities.
First, you want to open the iCloud app and look to where it says “Bookmarks”. Click the “Options…” button to get started.

Check off all the browsers with which you want to sync bookmarks with Safari. As you can see, you can do this with Internet Explorer, Firefox, and Chrome.
When you have picked your browsers, click “OK”.

Back on the main iCloud app window, click “Apply”. If you want to use iCloud sync with Chrome, you will be informed you need to download the iCloud Bookmarks extension.

Click “Download…” and Chrome will open to the iCloud Bookmarks extension page.

Click “Add to Chrome” and the iCloud Bookmarks extension will appear in the upper-right corner with all your other extensions.

The process is similar on Firefox. The browser will open to the extension page and you will need to click “Add to Firefox” to install it.

Another prompt will then ask you confirm the installation by clicking the “Install” button.

It’s important to know that iCloud Bookmarks sync won’t work with Chrome or Firefox on your Mac, and obviously Internet Explorer doesn’t exist on this platform. This means that if you make any changes to your bookmarks, you will have to use those browsers on your Windows machine to sync the bookmarks to Safari.

Also, if you end up syncing all three browsers to Safari, you might end up with kind of a mess. It’s best to use your favorite browser of the three to sync your bookmarks so you don’t end up with a bunch of disorganized duplicates.
For example, if you imported your bookmarks into Safari manually from Chrome at one time or another, and you continually updated your Chrome bookmarks, then your Safari bookmarks may be out-of-date. In such a case, your bookmarks will be merged and you’ll wind up with outdated bookmarks in Chrome.
Therefore, before you start syncing your bookmarks, you might want to clear out your bookmarks from one browser or another. In other words, if your Safari bookmarks are the ones that are up-to-date, then you’ll want to sync those to Chrome, Firefox, or Internet Explorer. On the other hand, if your Chrome bookmarks are most recent, then you’d want to sync those instead.
We hope you found this article useful. If you have any questions or comments you would like to contribute, please leave your feedback in our discussion forum.

How to Uninstall Extensions in Chrome, Firefox, and Other Browsers



(adsbygoogle=window.adsbygoogle||[]).push({});

Most modern browsers support extensions, which add additional features to your browser. But the fewer extensions you have installed, the speedier your browser should be. Here’s how to uninstall or disable extensions you don’t use.
Programs–like your antivirus–can often install their own browser extensions without your permission, so this is useful for uninstalling those as well. Each web browser has its own extensions. Removing an extension, add-on, or plug-in from one browser–like Chrome–won’t remove any similar extensions from your other installed browsers–like Firefox or Internet Explorer.
Note that browser plug-ins–like Java, Silverlight, and Flash–are different, and must be uninstalled in another way.

How to Uninstall Extensions in Google Chrome

RELATED ARTICLEHow to View and Disable Installed Plug-ins in Any Browser
Google Chrome (and other Chromium-based web browsers) make this fairly easy. In Chrome, click the menu button at the top-right corner of the window, point to “More tools,” and select “Extensions.”
You can also click the menu button, select “Settings,” and select the “Extensions” option at the left side of the Settings page, or type chrome://extensions into the address bar.

Chrome will display your list of installed extensions. Scroll through the list and click the trash can icon to the right of any extensions you want to uninstall. You can also just uncheck the “Enabled” box to temporarily disable an extension without uninstalling it. You won’t have to restart your browser after uninstalling or disabling extensions.
If you’ve set up syncing with your Google account in Chrome, and it’s synchronizing your installed extensions, this will also uninstall that extension on your other computers.

How to Uninstall Add-Ons in Mozilla Firefox

In Firefox, click the “Menu” button in the upper right corner and then click the “Add-ons” button to go directly to your list of installed Firefox add-ons. Click the puzzle piece icon on the left side of the page to view your browser extensions. (The other icons here allow you to manage your installed themes, browser plug-ins, and “social services.”)

From here, you can right-click an extension to uninstall it from your browser or temporarily disable it. If you see a “Restart Now” link, you’ll need to restart Firefox to finish the uninstallation process.
If an extension was installed by another program on your computer, you’ll only be able to “Disable” it instead of fully removing it from your browser. To remove the extension, you’d have to uninstall the associated program. You could try removing an extension’s files by hand, but, if it was installed by a program running on your computer, that program could just re-add those files in the future. But you don’t have to worry about that–a disabled extension might clutter the list of extensions, but it won’t run at all. It’s as good as if it were uninstalled.

How to Uninstall Add-Ons in Internet Explorer

To disable a toolbar or other browser extension in Internet Explorer, click the gear menu at the top-right corner of the browser window and select “Manage add-ons.”

Select “Toolbars and Extensions” under Add-on Types, and then click the “Show” box and ensure it’s set to “All add-ons.” This ensures you’ll see all your installed browser extensions here.

Locate the extension you want to remove, paying attention to the “Name” and “Publisher” fields to identify them. If you see an extension with an unfamiliar name, try performing a web search for it. Select the extension and click the “Disable” button at the bottom-right of the window to disable it.

To completely uninstall an extension instead of just disabling it, you’ll usually need to visit the “Uninstall a program” pane in the Windows Control Panel and uninstall that plug-in. You may need to look for the name of the plug-in itself, or you may have to uninstall a program the plug-in came bundled with.
If you don’t see it in the list, you might want to perform a web search online. Some malicious extensions won’t include any easy uninstaller, so you’ll have to find an uninstall tool or remove the files by hand. Search the web for how to uninstall that particular extension from Internet Explorer and you’ll see more specific instructions.

How to Uninstall Extensions in Apple’s Safari

To manage your list of installed browser extensions in Safari, click the “Safari” menu at the top of your Mac’s desktop and select “Preferences.” Don’t click “Safari Extensions”–that’ll just take you to Apple’s Safari Extensions Gallery website you can download more extensions.

Click the “Extensions” icon at the top of the Preferences window to see your list of installed extensions. Select an extension at the left side of the screen and either click the “Uninstall” button to remove it from your Mac or uncheck the “Enable [Extension Name]” box to disable the extension without removing it entirely.

How to Uninstall Extensions in Opera

In Opera, click the “Opera” menu button at the top-left corner of the browser window, point to “Extensions,” and select “Extensions manager” to see a list of your installed extensions.

Click the “x” button to the right of an extension to remove it, or click the “Disable” button under an extension to disable it without removing it from your browser. You won’t have to restart Opera after disabling or removing an extension.


Microsoft Edge doesn’t yet support extensions, but it’s gaining support for Chrome-style extensions soon. This process should be similar on Edge when it ultimately does gain support for browser extensions.
If you use another web browser, the process should be similar. Look in your web browser’s menus for an option about “extensions,” “add-ons,” or “plug-ins.”

How to Restore Recently Closed Tabs in Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Internet Explorer, and Microsoft Edge

You accidentally closed a tab, then realized you weren’t done with that webpage. Or, you want to open that elusive webpage you visited last week, but you forgot to bookmark it. No worries, you can get your closed tabs back.
For each of the five most popular browsers, we’ll show you how to reopen the last closed tab, how to access the browsing history in each browser so you can reopen tabs you closed in previous browsing sessions, and how to manually open all the tabs from your last browsing session.



(adsbygoogle=window.adsbygoogle||[]).push({});

Google Chrome

To reopen the most recently closed tab in Chrome, right-click on the tab bar and select “Reopen closed tab” from the popup menu. You can also press Ctrl+Shift+T on your keyboard to reopen the last closed tab. Repeatedly selecting “Reopen closed tab”, or pressing Ctrl+Shift+T will open previously closed tabs in the order they were closed.
The option is in a different place on the menu depending on whether you right-clicked on a tab or on an empty part of the tab bar.

If you can’t remember the URL or name of a webpage you visited last week, that you want to visit again, you can look through your browsing history to see if looking at the webpages you’ve visited jogs your memory. To access your browsing history, click the Chrome menu button (three horizontal bars) in the upper-right corner of the browser window. Then, select History > History.
Under “Recently closed”, on the submenu, selecting the option that says “X tabs” (for example, “2 tabs”) will open that many recently closed tabs in a new browser window.

Your browsing history displays on a new tab, grouped into time periods. To open the webpage from today, yesterday, or from a specific date before that, simply click the link for the page you want. The webpage opens on the same tab.

Firefox

To reopen the last closed tab in Firefox, right-click on the tab bar and select “Undo Close Tab” from the popup menu. You can also press Ctrl+Shift+T on your keyboard to open the last closed tab. Repeatedly selecting “Undo Close Tab”, or pressing Ctrl+Shift+T will open previously closed tabs in the order they were closed.
Again, the option is in a different place on the menu depending on whether you right-clicked on a tab or on an empty part of the tab bar.

To reopen a specific tab or webpage you closed, click the Firefox menu button (three horizontal bars) in the upper-right corner of the browser window. Then, click the “History” icon.

The History menu displays. Click on a webpage to open it in the current tab. Notice that recently closed tabs are also listed under Restore Closed Tabs. You can also click on “Restore Closed Tabs” to restore all the tabs listed under that heading onto new tabs in the current browser window.

Again, maybe you forgot the name or URL for a webpage you visited last week. You can view your browsing history in Firefox by time periods in a sidebar. To do this, click the Firefox menu button and select “View History Sidebar” from the History drop-down menu.

In the History sidebar, click “Last 7 days” to see all the webpages you visited in the last week. Click on a site to view it in the current tab. You can also view lists of webpages you visited in previous months and older than six months. The History sidebar stays open until you close it using the “X” button in the upper-right corner of the pane.

You can also access your browsing history on a dialog box by click “Show All History” on the History menu.

In the left pane, on the Library dialog box, you can access your browsing history by time periods and then double-click on a site in the right pane to open it on the current tab.

If you want to open all the tabs you had open in your last browsing session, select “Restore Previous Session” from the “History” menu. The tabs are opened in the current browsing window and the window resizes to the size it was in the last browsing session, if the size was different.

Opera

To reopen the last closed tab in Opera, right-click on the tab bar and select “Reopen last closed tab” from the drop-down list or press Ctrl+Shift+T on your keyboard. Repeatedly selecting Reopen last closed tab, or pressing Ctrl+Shift+T will open previously closed tabs in the order they were closed.
The option is in a different place on the menu depending on whether you right-clicked on a tab or on an empty part of the tab bar.

You can also click the Tab Menu button in the upper-right corner of the browser window and click “Recently closed” to expand a list of recently closed tabs. Click on the name of the webpage you want to reopen it on a new tab to the left (not the right) of the current tab.

If you want to reopen a webpage you viewed earlier today, yesterday, or prior to that, click the Opera Menu button in the upper-left corner of the browser window and select “History” from the drop-down menu.

The History page displays with links organized by date. To reopen a webpage, simply click on it in the list. The page will open on a new tab to the right of the History tab.

Opera 39 does not have a way to manually open all the tabs from the last browsing session.

Internet Explorer

To reopen the most recently closed tab in Internet Explorer, right-click on a tab and select “Reopen closed tab”, or press Ctrl+Shift+T on your keyboard. Repeatedly selecting Reopen closed tab, or pressing Ctrl+Shift+T will open previously closed tabs in the order they were closed.

If you want to choose from a list of recently closed tabs, right-click on any tab and select “Recently closed tabs” and then select the webpage you want to reopen from the submenu. You can also open all closed tabs from the current session on new tabs by selecting “Open all closed tabs”.
NOTE: The options to open recently closed tabs is only available when you right-click on a tab, not on the empty space on the tab bar.

You can also reopen closed tabs from the New Tab page. To do so, open a new tab and click the “Reopen closed tabs” link in the bottom-left corner of the New Tab page. Select a tab from the popup menu or select “Open all closed tabs” to reopen all tabs that were closed in the current session.

If you’ve just spaced on the name and URL of the webpage you visited last week, and you want to open it again, you can view your browsing history in Internet Explorer by time periods in a the History sidebar. To do this, click the “View favorites, feeds, and history button in the upper-right corner of the browser window, or press Alt+C on your keyboard.

Click the “History” tab and then select the time frame corresponding to when you visited the webpage you want to reopen. Look through the list that displays and click on the webpage you want to reopen.

You can also easily reopen all the tabs from the last browsing session in Internet Explorer 11. To do so, you need to display the Command bar, if it’s not already active. Right-click on any empty part of the tab bar and select “Command bar” from the popup menu.

Click the “Tools” button on the Command bar and select “Reopen last browsing session” from the drop-down menu. The tabs from your last browsing session are all opened on new tabs in the current browser window.

Microsoft Edge

To reopen the most recently closed tab in Microsoft Edge, right-click on a tab and select “Reopen closed tab”, or press Ctrl+Shift+T on your keyboard. Repeatedly selecting Reopen closed tab, or pressing Ctrl+Shift+T will open previously closed tabs in the order they were closed.
NOTE: Make sure you right-click on a tab. The Reopen closed tab option is not available if you right-click on the empty space on the tab bar.

To reopen a webpage you opened last week or before, click the “Hub” button on the toolbar in the upper-right corner of the browser window to access your browsing history.

Click the History icon at the top of the pane and then click on a time period, such as “Last week” or “Older”, to view a list of webpages visited during that period. Click the webpage you want to reopen. The page opens on the current tab.

Like Opera, Microsoft Edge does not have a way to manually open all the tabs from the last browsing session.
In all five of these browsers, you can also press Ctrl+H to access the History and reopen previously viewed webpages from the list.

How to Remove URLs from Auto-Suggestions in Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer

We’ve all had this happen: you start typing a URL in front of all your friends, only for them to see horrible auto-suggestions for sites from your history. Or maybe you incorrectly typee a URL one time and now it shows up every time. The good news is that there’s a really easy way to delete any suggestion from Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer.
RELATED ARTICLEHow to Enable Private Browsing on Any Web Browser
You’ll notice that Microsoft Edge isn’t on the list. There’s one good reason for that: you can’t delete suggested URLs in Edge. Yeah, Microsoft’s browser of the future has some pretty gaping holes when it comes to basic features. Alas, it is what it is. You’re probably using one of the other options anyway, right?



(adsbygoogle=window.adsbygoogle||[]).push({});

How to Delete Autofill URLs from Chrome

If you’re a Chrome user (which, statistically, you likely are), this is easy.
Once you’ve started typing the URL and the incorrect (or otherwise undesired) suggestion pops up, simply highlight it and press Shift+Delete on your keyboard.

Poof! It disappears, like magic.

How to Delete Autofill URLs from Firefox

If you prefer to take the road less traveled, Firefox is probably your browser. The good news is that deleting suggested URLs in Firefox is easy peasy (in fact, it’s the same as Chrome).
When you’re typing a URL and an unwanted suggestion shows up, highlight it and press Shift+ Delete on your keyboard. Bam. Gone.

How to Delete Autofill URLs from Internet Explorer

Lots of people still use Internet Explorer for everyday browsing—after all, it’s probably already on your PC. If IE is your go-to, the process varies slightly from other browsers, but is just as simple.
When you start typing a URL, the suggestions will appear down below. Using the mouse, hover over the one you’d like to remove from the list—a small X will appear on the far right side. Clicking this will delete the suggestion from the list.
 
While simple enough, it’s one of those things that not everyone knows—but everyone needs occasionally.